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  • Use this image under non-commercial licence

    This image was created and shared by: Scottish War Memorials Project

    The image is free to reuse for non-commercial purposes under the IWM Non Commercial Licence. By downloading any images or embedding any media, you agree to the terms and conditions of the IWM Non Commercial Licence, including your use of the attribution statement specified by IWM. For this item, that is: © Scottish War Memorials Project (WMR-80050)

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  • Use this image under non-commercial licence

    This image was created and shared by: Scottish War Memorials Project

    The image is free to reuse for non-commercial purposes under the IWM Non Commercial Licence. By downloading any images or embedding any media, you agree to the terms and conditions of the IWM Non Commercial Licence, including your use of the attribution statement specified by IWM. For this item, that is: © Scottish War Memorials Project (WMR-80050)

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Memorial details

Memorial type
Board / Plaque / Tablet
District
Perth And Kinross
Town
Aberfeldy
County
Tayside
Country
Scotland
Commemoration
First World War (1914-1918)
Ceremony
  • Unveiled
    Date: 12 June 1921
    Attended by: Mrs James B. Haggart, Eilian Riabhach, wife of the Provost
  • Dedicated
    Date: 12 June 1921
    Attended by: Revd John MacRae
  • Show More (1)
Lost
Not lost
WM Reference
80050
Current location

Breadalbane Academy
Crieff Road
Aberfeldy
Perth And Kinross
Tayside
PH15 2DU
Scotland

OS Grid Ref: NN 85381 48832
Denomination: Undefined

View location on Google Maps
Description
Metal Plaque in an oak frame , which has a broken pediment. There is a bronze wreath within the broken pediment.
Inscription
Top of Frame-BREADALBANE ACADEMY/ABERFELDY Plaque-ROLL OF HONOIR/Old Boys of this School/who gave their lives for/King & Country in the/GREAT WAR 1914-1919/[names in 2 columns] Bottom of frame-"Their name liveth for evermore"
Inscription legible?
yes
Names on memorial
Adams, David
Bett, Kenneth
Burden, Duncan
Cameron, Arch.
Campbell, Alex.
Campbell, Arch.
Campbell, George
Campbell, John
Campbell, Neil
Campbell, Robt.
See details for all 60 names
Commemorations
  • First World War (1914-1918)
    Total names on memorial: 60
    Served and returned: 0
    Died: 60
    Exact count: yes
    Information shown: surname, forename
    Order of information: surname
Components
  • Plaque
    Measurements: Undefined
    Materials: Metal
  • Frame
    Measurements: Undefined
    Materials: Wood - Oak
  • Detail
    Measurements: Undefined
    Materials: Bronze
Condition
Trust fund/Scholarship
No
Purpose: Unknown or N/A
Reference
  • warmemscot.s4.bizhat.com/viewtopic.php?t=4155&mforum=warmemscot
  • PERTHSHIRE ADVERTISER: 15.06.1921 BRAVE SONS OF ABERFELDY UNVEILING OF BREADALBANE ACADEMY WAR MEMORIAL TOUCHING CEREMONY RECTOR’S BEAUTIFUL TRIBUTE TO FORMER PUPILS A very impressive ceremony was held in the Breadalbane Academy, Aberfeldy, last Sunday afternoon, when a handsome oak panel with fifty-nine names of former pupils of the school who have fallen in the Great War was unveiled by Mrs James B. Haggart, Eilian Riabhach, in presence of the school pupils and a fairly large gathering of parents and relatives. Mr James Macnaughton, Edragull, presided and in opening the proceedings said they were met there for a brief hour that afternoon to show their gratitude and love for, and to do honour to the memory of, the boys of that school who had made the great sacrifice in the war. After the singing of the 2nd Paraphrase, the Rev. C. W. Hutcheson, Parish Church, engaged in prayer, and Provost Haggart followed with an address. His first duty, the Provost said, was to thank the Rector, and members of the staff, and the scholars of the Academy for the honour they had done him in asking him to take part in the memorable and impressive ceremony. As an old boy of that school, and as Provost of the town, he felt it an honour to be there. He was proud to take his share in the life of the burgh. He had also had, along with his wife, the proud privilege of taking a share in the war work during the long and bitter struggle. He understood it was on that account they had honoured him that day in asking his wife and himself to be there, and he offered him their thanks for the generous appreciation of his public service. They were met to add their tribute of esteem and gratitude to the memory of the brave lads who had gone from that school; to pay their tribute of homage to their conquering dead. The memorial which they were to unveil that day would be the proud past of the future boys and girls of the Academy, and they would all look forward with all helpfulness to the present as well as future generations to carry on the noble efforts and advance the destinies of this nation. Their finest and tenderest sympathies were awakened as they thought of the men who had gone forward, had fought and had died in the great struggle. That Roll of Honour would perpetuate the names of those brave fellows, and inspire future generations of pupils in that school to noble deeds and to the highest patriotism. “Learning”, Bacon said, “Should be made subservient to action”, and your notions boys and girls, continued Provost Haggart will depend on the conception you form in your school days of the duties and privileges involved in the greatest of civil virtues and national character - Patriotism. It was this patriotism which had inspired the boys who had gone from that school and who had given their lives in the performance of splendid deeds of heroic bravery and unselfish devotion. These boys had given them liberty, and had advanced civilization, and had left a great record. They ought, therefore, to foster the spirit of patriotism in school - their natural instinct and great tradition. It was that tradition they were now revering. The memory of Wallace and Bruce stirred in their veins. It would help to promote among the boys and girls, where it had root, a sense of public duty, a growth of the spirit of self-sacrifice. He hoped the sacrifice of the boys would not be in vein but they would uphold their splendid spirit. Let them strive to maintain their splendid example. He would only remind them of one universal concept of the rule of success - “Whatever they had findeth to do, do it with all thy might”. No work was worth doing badly, and they must all exert themselves if they were to succeed in life. He counselled them to put forth every effort if they meant to succeed. He should like to congratulate the Rector of the Academy of having so splendidly upheld the traditions of the school, and of the historic burgh in which they all lived. It was an incentive for them all to go forward carrying those traditions nobly. He wished to congratulate the Rector and the staff of the Academy upon having built up that splendid character which had enabled the boys whom they were met there that afternoon to honour, to do as they had done. He had to congratulate the scholars upon the memorial they were now erecting. They had done their part in erecting that tribute to their fallen heroes. Every boy and girl in every class in the school had done his or her little bit in erecting the memorial. He would conclude his remarks by saying let them never forget the splendid example and the noble efforts of the heroes whom they were met their that day to honour. Mrs Haggart then unveiled the memorial, and in doing so said - “Mr Chairman, ladies and gentlemen, boys and girls, I feel deeply the honour of unveiling this memorial to the brave men who gave their lives for their country’s sake, and the safety of those who follow after. I would thank the Rector and staff for having accorded me the solemn privilege. You, boys and girls, have a wondrous example in the self-sacrifice and bravery of these pupils of the Academy. Their memory will ever be a sublime incentive to become men and women worthy of the tradition that the great and glorious host of those who made the utmost sacrifice have left behind them. We must all, men and women, boys and girls alike, strive to be deserving of the sacrifice that was made for us, and endeavour so to construct our lives that we may bring happiness and good to those around us. We must learn to follow this noble example set before us, and become self-sacrificing too. “Our hearts are filled with sympathy for the parents, wives, children and friends whose loved ones are parted from them for a while, although I believe their spirits are ever near us. But our hearts rejoice with pride and thanksgiving for the bravery, loyalty and courage displayed by those to whom this lasting tribute is raised. I now unveil this memorial to the glory of God, and in grateful memory of the fallen heroes whose names are inscribed there”. The Rector then read over the names of the Academy’s fallen heroes, and in a short bust most impressive speech said he took that opportunity to thank the Provost and Mrs Haggart on behalf of the staff for the hearty and ready manner in which they have acceded to their unanimous wish that they should take part in the proceedings. That was neither the time nor the place to eulogise the good work of Provost and Mrs Haggart. They all knew how much the Provost had done, and the warm interest he at all times took in the welfare of the town, and they were also fully aware of the prominent part Mrs Haggart had taken in war work, and indeed all projects for the good of Aberfeldy. He (Rector Grieve) would content himself by expressing their indebtedness for their presence there that day, and expressing also their indebtedness for, and appreciation of, the kind words of sympathy extended to the relatives, and thank Provost and Mrs Haggart for the gracious and graceful manner in which they had discharged their duties. In a voice full of emotion the Rector continued “The names on that Roll of Honour are the names of former pupils of the school, now no more. To some of you they may be merely names, but to me they are more than names - they are personalities. I have often looked over the list since it was printed, and I seem to see the boys sitting in their seats doing their appointed tasks or hear their laughter in the playground, and today these boys are very present to me, and they seem to call upon me to speak to you, and tell you now, ‘We are not dead though our bodies, mangled and torn by a ruthless war, lie buried in home or foreign land. Our spirits live, and haunt these rooms and benches where our eager youth was spent, and whence, equipped with precepts, and little knowledge, we went forth into the great world to do our work and mingle with our fellow men, and so continue till the call went forth that the mother country was in danger and called upon her sons to come to her help and defend the glorious heritage and birth right of the freedom we had enjoyed. We laid aside the implements of peace, and assumed the implements of war, and while still in the freshness of youth and on the threshold of manhood, fought for our beloved land and gave our lives that you might continue to enjoy that precious heritage and freedom in a country free’. So they seem to speak to you through me and further they ask me to prove yourselves worthy of the great sacrifice they have made. How shall we prove ourselves? By becoming fighters too; but not with the implements of war, but peaceful fighters, no none the less strenuous. Let us fight against all that is low, mean, base, cowardly, ignoble and dishonourable; fight for everything that is of high esteem, noble, honourable and good, and in doing this you will be trying to be worthy of the great sacrifices they have made. This is not easy. The chief enemy you have to overcome is yourself. You must control your thoughts, your words and your actions. Know what is good, and true and right, and try to attain it. Harbour no unworthy or unclean thoughts. If they come, banish them, and replace them with others that are more worthy. Let your speech at all times consist of words and phrases that will be an index of good thoughts, and of good disposition. Ask yourselves time and again, Am I worthy of the great sacrifices these boys have made for me. In a few years these names will be but names to the pupils of this school. I ask the teachers every now and again to tell the pupils what these lads have done for us, and in that way to keep their memory green, and especially would I ask that on Armistice Day, this Roll of Honour may be read over, and a brief story told of what these boys, who were once pupils of this school, have done for you and me, for their King and their Country”. The Rev John MacRae gave a very earnest dedication prayer. He prayed especially for those whose hearts were bleeding afresh that day for loved ones who had been taken from them. Might the sorrowing ones be sustained, and strengthened and comforted, and think with honourable pride of their dear ones who had given their lives for them all. Might the time soon come when such a sacrifice as they had made be no longer necessary. Might the spirit of Christ become the prevailing spirit, and the spirit of love and brotherhood permeate all nations and all peoples. A laurel wreath was then laid at the foot of the Roll of Honour by one of the pupils. Mr W. G. Folkarde played the Dead march on the organ, and the Rev. W. A. Macfarlane, Dull, pronounced the Benediction. An unveiling ceremony which had touched the hearts of all present was concluded with the singing of the National Anthem. The Academy Roll of Honour is as follows: Adams, David, Annesley Cottage; Burden, Duncan, Market Street; Cameron, Arch., Home Farm. Campbell, Alex., Glencona; Campbell, George, Glencona; Campbell, Arch., Dunkeld Street; Campbell, John, Tighnduin; Campbell, Neil, Kenmore Street; Campbell, Robert, Breadalbane Terrace; Campbell, Robert, Factory Buildings; Clogg, William, Burnside; Dewar, William, Breadalbane Terrace; Dewar, Peter, Burnside; Dewar, James, Kinghallan, Fortingall; Douglas, Donald, Killiechassie; Finlayson, Adam, Kenmore Street; Finlayson, John, Kenmore Street; Fisher, Peter, Chapel Street; Forbes, J. Atholl, Kenmore Street; Fraser, Hugh, Dunkeld Street; Grieve, David C., Craignair; Halliday, John, Braehead; Irvine, Duncan, Chapel Street; Kennedy, John, Chapel Street; Low, John, Balhomas; MacDonald, Alexander, Rockhill; MacDonald, Tom, Chapel Street; MacDougall, Robert, Chapel Street; Macfarlane, Hudson T., Craignair; MacGregor, Alexander, Bank Street; MacGregor, Alexander, Dunskaig; MacIntosh, William, Mill Street; MacIntosh, John, Coshieville; MacIntyre, James, Bank Street; MacLaren, Ian, West Croft; MacLaren, Malcolm, West Croft; M’Leod, William, Breadalbane Terrace; Macnaughton, Alexander, Carndhu; Macnaughton, Peter, Braehead; MacPherson, Angus, Kenmore Street; Menzies, John, Home Street; Menzies, Robert, Tirinie; Munro, John, Wellbank; Munro, Donald, Tullicro; Queen, James, Chapel Street; Robertson, Alexander, Dunkeld Street; Robertson, Fergus, Tayside Cottages; Robertson, John, Dunkeld Street; Robertson, William, Boltachan; Simpson, Thomas, Fortingall; Stewart, James, Breadalbane Terrace; Stewart, George, Breadalbane terrace; Stewart, Mingo, Grandtully; Stewart, Robert, Weem; Stewart, John, Tullichroisk; Tulloch, John, Fortingall; Walker, John, Chapel Street.

This record comprises all information held by IWM’s War Memorials Register for this memorial. Where we hold a names list for the memorial, this information will be displayed on the memorial record. Please check back as we are adding more names to the database.

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© WMR-80050

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