The Falklands Conflict, with actor Katherine Parkinson

1982 saw the start of the Falklands Conflict. But why did the United Kingdom, steered by Margaret Thatcher, send its Navy to defend the Falklands, a tiny group of islands over 8,000 miles from Britain? Why were the islands so important to Argentina and its government? And what are the prospects for reconciliation forty years later?

Find out in the episode below.

GUESTS

Meet the guests on this podcast episode.

  • Katherine Parkinson - Falklands Conflict

    Actor Katherine Parkinson makes sense of the conflict with IWM expert John Beales, historian Helen Parr and veteran Richard Gough.

OBJECTS

Read more about the IWM collections items featured in this episode.

  • The sinking of the Royal Navy frigate HMS ARDENT.

    Photograph of the HMS Ardent

    Photograph of the HMS Ardent on fire, with HMS Yarmouth alongside, after being attacked for the first time in San Carlos Water by the Argentine Air Force on 21 May 1982. The ship had been struck by two 1,000lb bombs and 22 lives lost.

  • Boots, ankle length DMS

    Pair of boots

    Pair of black leather ankle-length laced boots with a toe caps and heels, and moulded rubber soles.

  • Flight deck operations on board HMS HERMES. A Sea Harrier takes off from the ski-jump while various missiles, helicopters and vehicles crowd the flight deck of the carrier. The arms front to back include: 1000lb GP bombs with type 114 'Slick' tails, 1000lb GP Bombs with Type 117 parachute 'retarded' tails, Sidewinder air-to-air missiles and Sea Skua air-to-surface missiles.

    Photograph of a Sea Harrier

     A Sea Harrier takes off from the ski-jump while various missiles, helicopters and vehicles crowd the flight deck of the carrier. The arms front to back include: 1000lb GP bombs with type 114 'Slick' tails, 1000lb GP Bombs with Type 117 parachute 'retarded' tails, Sidewinder air-to-air missiles and Sea Skua air-to-surface missiles.

  • Exocet Missile on display at IWM London

    Exocet Missile

    The Argentinians used French-made Exocet missiles to attack British ships, sinking two and damaging a third. This MM38 Exocet is the same type of missile as that fired at HMS Glamorgan on 12 June 1982. The attack resulted in the death of 14 sailors. 

Conflict of Interest - Series Two

 

See more from Series Two of Conflict of Interest, a podcast which invites celebrities to ask the simple questions about the world's most complex conflicts, with guests including comedian & activist Eddie Izzard, actor Katherine Parkinson and radio host Cerys Matthews, alongside curators, experts and eyewitnesses.

Listen Here >

IWM Institute

Brought to you by the IWM Institute, Imperial War Museums' innovation hub, creating new ways of deepening understanding of war and conflict.

EXPLORE THE FALKLANDS CONFLICT

The Type 42 destroyer HMS SHEFFIELD on fire after being struck by an AM.39 Exocet missile fired from an Argentine aircraft from a distance of 6 miles.
Britain And The Commonwealth Since 1945

A Short History of The Falklands War

The Falklands Conflict was a short undeclared war between Argentina and Britain over the sovereignty of the Falkland Islands (known as Islas Malvinas in Argentina), South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands. 
Margaret Thatcher superimposed onto a map of the Falklands with British and Argentinian flags on either side.
Cold War

Why the Falklands Conflict happened | Episode 1

In the first episode of our five-part Falklands series IWM Curator Carl Warner looks at why the Falklands Conflict happened. Why did Argentina believe they could take the Falklands without a fight? What was the invasion like? And why did Britain choose to fight for these islands 8,000 miles from home?
Falkands Conflict at Sea thumbnail
Cold War

Falklands Conflict at Sea | Episode 2

In this video, IWM Curator Alan Jeffreys tells us about the Falklands Conflict at Sea. We look at an Exocet Missile on display at IWM London and some objects that belonged to commander of a naval bomb disposal team, Nigel 'Bernie' Bruen including a scorched alarm bell from RFA Sir Tristram.