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  • Use this image under non-commercial licence

    This image was created and shared by: Tam (Thomas) Nugent

    The image is free to reuse for non-commercial purposes under the IWM Non Commercial Licence. By downloading any images or embedding any media, you agree to the terms and conditions of the IWM Non Commercial Licence, including your use of the attribution statement specified by IWM. For this item, that is: © Tam (Thomas) Nugent (WMR-55048)

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  • Use this image under non-commercial licence

    This image was created and shared by: Tam (Thomas) Nugent

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  • Use this image under non-commercial licence

    This image was created and shared by: Tam (Thomas) Nugent

    The image is free to reuse for non-commercial purposes under the IWM Non Commercial Licence. By downloading any images or embedding any media, you agree to the terms and conditions of the IWM Non Commercial Licence, including your use of the attribution statement specified by IWM. For this item, that is: © Tam (Thomas) Nugent (WMR-55048)

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Memorial details

Memorial type
Board / Plaque / Tablet
District
Inverclyde
Town
Port Glasgow
County
Strathclyde
Country
Scotland
Commemoration
First World War (1914-1918)
Ceremony
  • Unveiled
    Date: 3 September 1921
    Attended by: John Lewis, a wounded veteran of The Toll Boys who lost both legs in the war.
  • Dedicated
    Date: 2 June 2018
    Attended by: Undefined
  • Unveiled
    Date: February 2018
    Attended by: Undefined
  • Dedicated
    Date: 3 September 1921
    Attended by: Revd. Herbert Reid, who also was on active service for several years.
  • Show More (3)
Lost
Not lost
WM Reference
55048
Current location

Garden area on Robert Street adjacent to former location
Port Glasgow
Inverclyde
Strathclyde
PA14 5NW
Scotland

OS Grid Ref: NS 32922 74262
Denomination: Undefined

View location on Google Maps
Previous locations
  • At the time this address was known as 5 Glasgow Road (at the corner of Caledonia Street)
    but was changed to Robert Street due to Glasgow Road being realigned
    5
    Robert Street
    Port Glasgow
    Inverclyde
    Strathclyde
    PA14 5NW
    Scotland

    OS Grid Ref: NS 32922 74262
    Denomination: Undefined
Description
Until 2018 this was a Bronze plaque on granite tablet, fixed to the wall of the tenement building. In February 2018, due to proposed demolition of the tenement it was relocated to a nearby garden area, where a brand new Celtic cross on a plinth (both of polished white granite) has been built. The bronze plaque has been fixed to the plinth.
Inscription
On the plinth above the plaque-The Toll Boys Monument On the Plaque-1914 PRO PATRIA 1919/ ERECTED/ IN GRATEFUL MEMORY/ OF THE/ TOLL BOYS/ WHO FELL IN THE GREAT WAR/ (NAMES)/ "THEIR NAME LIVETH FOR EVERMORE"
Inscription legible?
yes
Names on memorial
Burnside, W
Collins, N
Couper, A
Couper, P
Duffy, J
Gilmour, S
Gourlay, S
Graham, R
Kane, S
Kincaid, J
See details for all 29 names
Commemorations
  • First World War (1914-1918)
    Total names on memorial: 29
    Served and returned: 0
    Died: 29
    Exact count: yes
    Information shown: Surname, initials of forenames, regiment
    Order of information: surname
Components
  • Plaque
    Measurements: height 700mm, width 500mm
    Materials: Bronze
  • Tablet
    Measurements: height 700mm, width 500mm
    Materials: Granite
  • Cross
    Measurements: Undefined
    Materials: Granite - Polished
  • Plinth
    Measurements: Undefined
    Materials: Granite - Polished
  • Base
    Measurements: Undefined
    Materials: Granite - Polished
Condition
Trust fund/Scholarship
No
Purpose: Unknown or N/A
Reference
  • warmemscot.s4.bizhat.com/viewtopic.php?p=84941
  • Newsreel footage of the 1921 unveiling-www.britishpathe.com/video/VLVA5A933YBDZCDFFEMSGR4B4W570-UNVEILING-OF-TOLL-BOYS-MEMORIAL-AT-PORT-GLASGOW/query/boy
  • www.facebook.com/Ward1chriscurleySNP/posts/769934126533626 (for dedication date)
  • News Report of the 2018 unveiling from 'Inverclyde Now'-www.inverclydenow.com/news/local-news/new-toll-boys-war-memorial-unveiled-in-port-glasgow NEW Toll Boys War Memorial Unveiled In Port Glasgow INVERCLYDE Council has created a new memorial to a group of Port Glasgow men killed in the First World War. The original bronze plaque bearing the names of the 29 Toll Boys has been moved from the wall of the building at 5 Glasgow Road -- where the old Toll House stood -- because of future regeneration plans. Environment and Regeneration convener councillor Michael McCormick said: “I am delighted the new memorial has been completed in plenty of time to mark the centenary of the end of World War One. We owe it to the sacrifice and selflessness of all who served, to pay our respects in the best way we can.” Depute Provost Councillor David Wilson said: “Every year the Toll Boys feature prominently in our local Remembrance Day programme and we want to continue with that tradition whilst of course honouring their memory and sacrifice. The council has come up with a sympathetic design which creates a new local focal point for the town and serves as a lasting and fitting tribute to the Toll Boys.” The Toll Boys were local unemployed men who spent their days repairing furniture at the Toll House to help others in the local community. They all perished in the conflict. Ronald Wilson is chairman of the Kindred Clubs of Port Glasgow which asked for council support for the new memorial. He said: “It is fitting that we honour the memory of not only these young lads, but also those local men and women who have laid down their lives in subsequent conflicts.” A re-dedication ceremony for the monument will be held later this year.
  • Reproduction of newspaper articles about the 1921 unveilimg, compiled by Mary Young, daughter of John Lewis, who unveiled the memorial (includes a photo of the medallion presented to him at the unveiling)-cmy.iay.org.uk/jacklewis/tollboys_pge7sep.htm
  • Sunday Post - Sunday 04 September 1921 LIMBLESS EX-SOLDIER UNVEILS WAR MEMORIAL. Port-Glagow, Saturday. In presence of a large gathering to-day the war memorial for twenty-nine lads from the known as The Toll was unveiled. The memorial takes the form of a bronze tablet three feet by two with a surround of granite three inches deep, and has been built into the wall of the houses at the corner of Caledonia Street, on the Glasgow Road. The unveiling ceremony was performed by Mr J. Lewis, an ex-soldier who lost both legs in the war, while the service of dedication was performed by the Rev. Herbert Reid, who also was on active service for several years. To-morrow the memorial table the Congregational Church will be unveiled by Miss Kerr, matron of Broadstone Jubilee Hospital, l'ort-Glasgow, and who, during the entire period of the war, was on active service France and Belgium.
  • THE PORT GLASGOW EXPRESS : WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 1921 Toll Boys’ War Memorial THE UNVEILING CEREMONY - IMPRESSIVE SERVICE The Toll Boys' Memorial was unveiled on Saturday afternoon, and the ceremony is one not likely soon to be forgotten by the large numbers who attended. It is interesting to know how much was done for the boys from this district who served in the great war, and now when all is over the handsome memorial which was unveiled on Saturday has been erected for twenty-nine of their number who will return to the scenes of their boyhood no more The memorial takes the form of a bronze tablet surrounded by grey granite, and is the work of Mr Archd. Hamilton, Glasgow. It had been placed on the wall of the building at 5 Glasgow Road immediately adjoining Caledonia Street, and where the Old Toll House formerly stood. The memorial has been erected at a cost of close on £70, this amount having been collected through the instrumentality of Mr and Mrs S. McKay, who initiated the proposal to erect the memorial. They have been untiring in their efforts, as have all the members of the committee, and the result of their labour of love may be seen by all who pass by. The memorial bears the names of the twenty-nine lads who fell in the war, and has the following inscription: "Erected in grateful memory of the Toll Boys who fell in the great war; their memory liveth for evermore." The present Toll Boys placed a wreath of purple and white heather at the foot of the memorial, and a wreath of variegated flowers was also placed beside the memorial by one of the relatives of the boys who had fallen. It was fitting that all those who took part in the ceremony on Saturday should have been on active service, and during the service Mr John Lewis, who had lost both legs at Ypres, and who performed the unveiling ceremony, completely broke down. It was. too much for him when the pipers of the Port and District Pipe Band played The Flowers o' the Forest. The day before this ex-soldier lost his legs was the last time he had heard the pipers play that tune, and it was over the burying place of his chum near Ypres. Little wonder the event of Saturday recalled such painful memories. The names of the lads inscribed on the memorial are: Messrs W. Burnside, R.G.A.; N. Collins, P. Cooper, S. Gilmour, R. Graham, S. Kane, J. Love, J. McGhie, J. McKay, D. Mooney, A. Orr, S. Ptolomey, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders; J. Kincaid, A. Logan, A. McKay, G. Potter, Cameron Highlanders; J. Rorison, Seaforth Highlanders; F. McCorkindale, Royal Scots; A. Cooper, Royal. Scots Greys; J. Logan, H.L.I.; R. McLean, Inniskilling Fusiliers; J. Duffy, S. Mitchell, S. Gourlay, Naval Division; C. Simpson, D. Wilson, Royal Navy; J. Shields, Royal Field Artillery; T. Walker, Durham Light Infantry; W. Tanner, Howitzer Brigade. A small platform was erected in front of the tenement, and on it were the company to take part in the ceremony, including Rev. Herbert Reid, M.C.; Messrs William Ramsay (who presided), Samuel Mackay, Robert Barr, and John Lewis. Mr Ramsay, in the course of a few opening remarks, said that on such a solemn occasion it was natural that their sympathies should go out to the relatives and friends of the dead heroes. Through their sorrow there was the feeling of pride in the comrades, and gratitude for what they did. That pride was all the greater when it was remembered that these twenty-nine heroes were Old Toll Boys. These gallant men had not been found wanting; they obeyed the call in 1914, and acquitted themselves like men. It was only natural that the Old Toll boys at home should desire to place on record for the inspection of all time the names of the heroes. Many of the old boys went into the great adventure willingly, not knowing that great suffering, even death, was before them. If the deeds of these brave men helped to make it impossible for great nations to war against each other, then their sacrifice would not be in vain; Already was there established a League of Nations, which was a step in the right direction. If they made "Trust" the watchword of all nations people might then look for the dawning of the day about which the national bard wrote - that man to man the world o'er would brothers be for all that. The Old Toll Boys at home had during the war collected £66 10s. Of that 28s went to thirty-eight men serving, the same to a nurse and a W.A.A.C., and a similar amount lodged in the bank for three prisoners of war. Rev. Herbert. Reid, who had been on active service for a number of years in France and Belgium, performed the service of dedication. His prayer was highly impressive, and he paid a glowing tribute to the young men who had gone out from that district. Trumpeter Harkness, of the Royal Garrison Artillery, sounded the "Last Post," and Port-Glasgow and District Pipe Band played "The Flowers o' the Forest." Bailie Cochran on behalf of the committee, presented Mr Lewis with a gold medal as a memento of the occasion. He referred briefly to the patriotism and gallantry displayed by the men from the Toll district and from the entire country during the dark days of the war, and hoped they would be spared a recurrence of such horrors. He had not the least doubt, however, if the occasion ever did arise, the boys from the Toll District would buckle on their armour as those whose memory they were perpetuating that day. Mr Lewis in a few words thanked Bailie Cochran and the committee for the presentation of the medal, and after singing the national anthem the large numbers present dispersed. There were many people visiting the memorial on Saturday evening and Sunday. ----- Separate items on the same page The Committee wishes to thank the members of the Band, Buglers and Mr Lithgow for permission in granting position for Memorial, and all who helped in any way to make Saturday’s Service so successful. S. McKay & R Barr, Conveners. ----- The picture of the unveiling of the Toll Boys’ Memorial on Saturday will be shown in the Eclipse tonight and during the remainder of the week.
  • THE GREENOCK TELEGRAPH : Monday, 5th September 1921 WAR MEMORIALS : Two Unveiled at Port-Glasgow : AN EAST-END TRIBUTE At the weekend two war memorials were unveiled at Port-Glasgow, and a third, situated in Fore Street, is nearing completion. An outstanding feature at both was that the principals taking part were all on active service. OLD TOLL BOYS' TABLET The attendance at Glasgow Road on Saturday afternoon was not far short of three thousand young and old, who had gathered to do honour to the memory of twenty-nine young men belonging to the Old Toll district who fell during the war. The memorial takes the form of a cast bronze tablet mounted on grey granite, and is the work of Mr Archd. Hamilton, 70 Glassford Street, Glasgow. It has been placed on the wall of the new red sandstone building at No. 5 Glasgow Road, immediately adjoining Caledonia Street. This is the exact spot where stood the Old Toll House, from which the boys take their name. Below the tablet was a floral tribute of variegated flowers. The inscription is; "Erected in grateful memory of the Toll boys who fell in the Great War. Their names liveth for ever." The following names are on the memorial:- Messrs W. Burnside, R.G.A.; N. Collins, P. Cooper, S. Gilmour, R. Graham, S. Kane, J. Love, J. McGhie, J. McKay, D. Mooney, A. Orr, S. Ptolomey, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders; J. Kincaid, A. Logan, A. McKay, G. Potter, Cameron Highlanders; J. Rorrison, Seaforth Highlanders; F. McCorkindale, Royal Scots; A. Cooper, Royal Scots Greys; J. Logan, H.L.I.; R. McLean, Inniskilling Fusiliers; J. Duffy, S. Mitchell, S. Gourlay, Naval Division; C. Simpson, D. Wilson, Royal Navy; J. Shields, Royal Field Artillery; T. Walker, Durham Light Infantry; W. Tanner, Howitzer Brigade. A small platform was erected in front of the tenement, and on it were the company to take part in the ceremony, including Rev. Herbert Reid, M.C.; Messrs William Ramsay (who presided), Samuel Mackay, Robert Barr and John Lewis. Mr Ramsay, in the course of a few opening remarks, said that on such a solemn occasion it was natural that their sympathies should go out to the relatives and friends of the dead heroes. Through their sorrow there was the feeling of pride in the comrades, and gratitude for what they did. That pride was all the greater when it was remembered that these twenty-nine heroes were Old Toll Boys. These gallant men had not been found wanting; they obeyed the call in 1914, and acquitted themselves like men. It was only natural that the Old Toll boys at home should desire to place on record for the inspection of all time the names of the heroes. Many of the old boys went into the great adventure willingly, not knowing that great suffering, even death, was before them. If the deeds of these brave men helped to make it impossible for great nations to war against each other, then their sacrifice would not be in vain. Already was there established a League of Nations, which was a step in the right direction. If they made "Trust" the watchword of all nations people might then look for the dawning of the day about which the national bard wrote - that man to man the world o'er would brothers be for all that. The Old Toll Boys at home had during the war collected £66 15s. Of that 28s went to thirty-eight men serving, the same to a nurse and a W.A.A.C., and a similar amount lodged in the bank for three prisoners of war. Rev. Mr Reid dedicated the tablet with an impressive prayer, and paid a tribute to the brave young men. Mr Lewis, who lost both legs at the war, and has artificial limbs, performed the unveiling ceremony. Trumpeter Harkness, of the Royal Garrison Artillery, sounded the "Last Post," and Port-Glasgow and District Pipe Band struck up "The Flowers o' the Forest." Bailie Cochran, in the name of the committee, handed over to Mr Lewis a gold medal as a memento of the occasion, and made a few remarks eulogistic of the patriotism and gallantry displayed by the men of the Toll district in the strenuous war years. He had no doubt if the occasion again arose those left would do the same as in the past. Mr Lewis briefly returned thanks. The medal has a representation of the old toll-house as it stood before demolition. The large assemblage dispersed after singing the National Anthem. On Saturday night and yesterday many people visited the district to get a look at the memorial.
  • THE PORT GLASGOW EXPRESS : FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1921 Toll Boys’ War Memorial UNVEILING CEREMONY TOMORROW As intimated in Wednesday’s issue the War Memorial of the Toll Boys who lost their lives in the great war will be unveiled tomorrow. The memorial has been erected at a cost of £67, which sum has been gathered by the committee in charge of the arrangements. The unveiling ceremony will be performed by Mr J. Lewis, who had the misfortune to lose both his legs in the war. Mr Wm. McLachlan has composed the following verses and dedicated them to the relatives of the following twenty-nine lads who left the Toll Corner to take part in the great war 1914-1918, and all of whom lost their lives in that great conflict. The names are:- W. Burnside, R.G.A.; N. Collins, P. Cooper, S. Gilmour, R. Graham, S. Kane, J. Love, J. McGhie, J. McKay, D. Mooney, A. Orr, S. Ptolomey, all A & S.H.; J. Kincaid, A. Logan, A. McKay, G. Potter, Cameron Highlanders; J. Rorison, Seaforth Highlanders; F. McCorkindale, Royal Scots; A. Cooper, Royal. Scots Greys; J. Logan, H.L.I.; R. McLean, Inneskilling Fusiliers; J. Duffy, S. Mitchell, S. Gourlay, Naval Division; C. Simpson, D. Wilson, Royal Navy; J. Shields, Royal Field Artillery; T. Walker, Durham Light Infantry; W. Tanner, Howitzer Brigade. You citizens of our town pray heed, And when these verses you do read Flock in your thousands out to the Toll, And see unveiled the heroes' roll. On August fourth, nineteen fourteen, Some stirring sights were surely seen. Our country for men sent out a call The German hordes to then forestall. Britain had taken stand for the right, Determined to stop German arrogance and might; Young men and old, the rich and the poor, Flocked to the colours with British pride sure. And out at the Toll the boys like the rest Prepared to join up and give of their best. They went like true heroes to their country's aid, Undaunted in spirit, not one bit afraid. Four years of carnage and terrible strife They battled for Britain; some gave up their lives. Homes were depleted, fathers and sons out there fell, And for home and their country their lives they did sell. Now times are all altered, peace once more now reigns; But at what a great cost that peace we have gained. As oftimes there flashes the thought o'er our mind Of the thousands now left, some maimed and some blind, And what of the lads who gave up their all, Who answered their Heavenly Father's swift call? Yet surely their home is Heaven above, Installed in the glory of our Father's love. They gave up their lives that we here should live. What more in this world could any man give? So now let us meet our homage to pay, To the memory of those who fell in the fray. They fought for the right to keep us all free, They fought for protection for both you and me; They lost their own lives our honour to save, Those lads from the Port the bravest of brave. For these young Toll lads we mourn to-day, And for those friends bereaved we earnestly pray That the Lord in His kindness, from His home above, Will console and help all with His wonderous love. Their names are embossed, on that tablet out there. We know 'twill be kept with tenderest care By the lads who have worked to erect their own roll, Of their chums who'll return no more to the Toll. For him who unveils that tablet out there, A thought I am sure for him we must spare. He fought for his country, but ah, what a cost! Maimed he returned, both legs he has lost. So what could be nobler than the Toll boys request, That Mr Lewis should answer and do their behest? To unveil that memorial to his comrades who fell That right over wrong should at all times excel? So let, many thoughts be given to-day. To the memory of all who fell in that fray: That for all years to come their names clear and bold, In our hearts be engraved in letters of gold.
  • THE PORT GLASGOW EXPRESS : WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 31, 1921 Toll Boys' War Memorial INTERESTING CEREMONY ON SATURDAY AN EAST-END TRIBUTE An interesting event will take place at the corner of Caledonia Street on the Glasgow Road on Saturday of this week, when the fine new war memorial for the Toll Boys who paid the supreme sacrifice in the Great War will be unveiled. The memorial takes the form of a bronze tablet three feet by two, which will have a granite base of three inches. For some time past the committee in charge of the memorial have been busily engaged raising the wherewithal to meet the cost of the tribute to the memory of the fallen, and their efforts have met with much success. Mr W. Ramsay, representing the Montgomerie Street people, will preside on Saturday, and the unveiling ceremony will be performed by Mr J. Lewis, one of the Toll Boys who lost his two legs in the war. The Rev. Herbert Reid will perform the dedication ceremony, and the Port-Glasgow and District Pipe Band will play The Flowers of the Forest, while the Last Post will be sounded by two buglers. A general invitation is extended to the public, and the old Toll Boys who served in the War are particularly requested to be present. The names of the twenty-nine who fell in the war will be published on Friday, along with a poetical tribute by Mr Wm. McLachlan.

This record comprises all information held by IWM’s War Memorials Register for this memorial. Where we hold a names list for the memorial, this information will be displayed on the memorial record. Please check back as we are adding more names to the database.

This information is made available under a Creative Commons BY-NC licence.

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© WMR-55048

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