Operation Dynamo Explained

Operation Dynamo Explained

The allied evacuations from Dunkirk in 1940 are often described as a miracle. After Germany's blitzkrieg swept through France and the Low Countries expectations for Operation Dynamo were dismally low, and yet over 338,000 allied soldiers were saved. So how did they do it?

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British soldiers wade out to a waiting destroyer off Dunkirk during Operation Dynamo.
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7 Photos From The Dunkirk Evacuations
Over 338,000 soldiers, a third of them French, were rescued between 27 May and 4 June on the beaches of the French port of Dunkirk. Here are seven photographs from the evacuation of Dunkirk.
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What you Need to Know about the Dunkirk Evacuations
In May 1940, the Allies teetered on the edge of catastrophe. The German invasion of France had pushed the British Expeditionary Force, with French and Belgian troops, back to the French port of Dunkirk - destruction awaited if a rescue operation was not mounted from across the Channel. 
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Second World War
Blitzkrieg Explained
In 1940, Hitler did the seemingly impossible. Within a matter of weeks, Germany had managed to take the entirety of France and send the British army back across the channel. This remarkable success was widely put down to their new tactic: Blitzkrieg or 'Lightning War'. So, what is Blitzkrieg and why was it so effective?