Did Britain really stand alone?

Did Britain really stand alone?

In 1940 the British Empire contained a quarter of the world's population and a fifth of its landmass, all of which, bar Ireland, was also at war with Germany. Far from standing alone, as the war spread across the globe, Britain relied on the people, land and resources of its Empire to continue fighting.

More British Empire

The Battle of Singapore, February 1942
© IWM HU 2781
Second World War
Britain and Decolonisation in South East and South Asia, 1945-1948
Victory over Japan Day marked the end of the Second World War in August 1945. Yet the conflict did not end on this day, particularly in Asia. While decolonisation across South and South East Asia seemed inevitable, the territory of the British Empire was at its apogee in 1945 and the journey to independence for countries in this region was not simple.
The 20th Deccan Horse, Indian Army, in Carnoy Valley, 7th Divisional Area, 14th July 1916.
© IWM (Q 825)
Battle of the Somme
The Role Of Empire And Commonwealth Troops During The Battle Of The Somme
Soldiers from the Empire and Commonwealth made a significant contribution to the Somme offensive. On 1 July 1916 a battalion from Newfoundland, attacked with the 29th Division, while the 1st Battalion, The Lincolnshire Regiment included a contingent from the Bermuda Volunteer Rifle Corps.
Indian Independence is celebrated in Malaya shortly before the start of the Malayan Emergency. The Indian flag is raised at Klang, Selangor.
Britain And The Commonwealth Since 1945
The End Of The British Empire After The Second World War
After the Second World War, the disintegration of Britain's empire transformed global politics. Before the war, Britain maintained colonies all over the world, which provided valuable raw materials, manpower and strategic bases. By 1945, however, colonies were an expensive liability for Clement Attlee's newly elected Labour government.