Friday 15 June 2018

The Battle of Britain, the aerial struggle between German and British air forces, took place during the late summer and autumn of 1940. During this time hundreds of British and Allied pilots were killed.

One of these casualties was pilot Officer Frederick Cecil Harrold, a Royal Air Force (RAF) Hurricane Pilot from Cambridge. He was killed in action on Saturday 28 September 1940, when his Hurricane was shot down by a Messerschmitt Bf 109 over Deal in Kent, just two days after being posted to 501 Squadron. He was buried at St Andrews Churchyard Cemetery, Cherry Hinton in Cambridgeshire.

These objects include items Frederick had with him when his aircraft came down, wreckage from the plane and his medals.

uniforms and insignia

RAF wings

uniforms and insignia

RAF wings

RAF Wings belonging to Pilot Officer Frederick Cecil Harrold. These wings would have been sewn onto his jacket.

The wings belonged to Pilot Officer Frederick Harrold, he was killed in action during the Battle of Britain. Harrold, of Hills Road, Cambridge, was killed on Saturday, 28th September over Deal, Kent, having only just been posted to 501 Squadron two days previously. Harrold was shot down by a MeBf109 and was later interred at St Andrews Churchyard Cemetery, Cherry Hinton.
RAF Wings belonging to Pilot Officer Frederick Cecil Harrold.
souvenirs and ephemera

Religious medallion

souvenirs and ephemera

Religious medallion

A religious medallion which belonged to Frederick.

Religious medallion depicting an altar on obverse and an eagle on the reverse, the medallion is metal and almond-shaped, around the altar is the folowing inscription 'GUILD OF SERVANTS OF THE SANCTUARY', around the eagle on reverse it reads INTROIBO AD ALTARE DEI', there is a metal ring through the top for mounting on a necklace or chain.
A religious medallion which belonged to Frederick.
souvenirs and ephemera

RAF cigarette case

souvenirs and ephemera

RAF cigarette case

RAF cigarette case, likely to have been included in Frederick’s personal effects when he died.

Tarnished gold painted metal cigarette case with RAF badge transfer on top of lid, the cigarette case is mis-shapen and will not shut, the outside of the case is engraved with a shallow zig-zag style geometric pattern, the inside of the case is undecorated and there is a retaining elastic band to keep cigarettes secure to one side.
RAF cigarette case, likely to have been included in Frederick’s personal effects when he died.
Equipment

Identity disk

Equipment

Identity disk

Frederick’s damaged identity disk, likely to have been on him when he died.

This identity disc belonged to Pilot Officer Frederick Harrold, a Hurricane pilot who was killed in action during the Battle of Britain. Harrold, of Hills Road, Cambridge, was killed on Saturday, 28th September over Deal, Kent, having only just been posted to 501 Squadron two days previously. Harrold was shot down by a MeBf109 and was later interred at St Andrews Churchyard Cemetery, Cherry Hinton.
Frederick’s damaged identity disk, likely to have been on him when he died.
souvenirs and ephemera

Door key

souvenirs and ephemera

Door key

Bent door key.

A bent alloy metal key, the top of the key has a single hole machined through the top centre and is embossed on both sides, one side is inscribed 'BRITISH MADE ETAS' and the other side is inscribed 'ETAS 17690'.
Bent door key.
souvenirs and ephemera

Perspex fragment

souvenirs and ephemera

Perspex fragment

Perspex fragment from Frederick’s Hurricane – excavated from the crash site.

A thick irregular-shaped perspex fragment.
Perspex fragment from Frederick’s Hurricane – excavated from the crash site.
Vehicles, aircraft and ships

Aircraft fragments

Vehicles, aircraft and ships

Aircraft fragments

Aircraft fragments from Frederick’s Hurricane.

Three aircraft fragments, the first being a metal bolt with twisted wire attached, the second being part of a supporting bracket - tubular in shape with flattened brackets at one end which are each machined with a pair of holes, and the third being a twisted fragment of aluminium showing a partial stamp reading '25 C'.
Aircraft fragments from Frederick’s Hurricane.
uniforms and insignia

Jacket

uniforms and insignia

Jacket

Frederick’s jacket from his service dress uniform. It appears that this is what Frederick was wearing when he was killed. The jacket and trousers clearly show evidence of severe wounds from the left side to the right. Both had been cleaned before we acquired them but there is still some staining and discoloration on the fabric.

Single-breasted open-collared four-pocket jacket of RAF blue. The cuffs feature single rank braid rings (Pilot Officer) and all but one of the RAF officer quality crested buttons are present (one re-sewn by curator back in position (top) as it became detached during examination, 4/Dec/2009). The integral cloth belt fitted with brass open double-claw buckle it attached.
Frederick’s jacket from his service dress uniform. We believe this is what Frederick was wearing when he was killed. © IWM (UNI 13724)
Decorations and awards

Medals

Decorations and awards

Medals

Star with 'Battle of Britain' clasp and other medals awarded to Pilot Officer Frederick Cecil Harrold.

1939-1945 Star with 'Battle of Britain' clasp.
Star with 'Battle of Britain' clasp and other medals awarded to Pilot Officer Frederick Cecil Harrold. © IWM (OMD 6914)

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