An ingenious invention

An ingenious invention

Two years before D-Day and Operation Overlord, the Allies mounted a daring rehearsal raid on the French port of Dieppe. The attack ended in disaster, but out of its ashes came one of the greatest unsung inventions of the Second World War, one that would keep the Allies in the fight when they returned to invade Normandy: the Mulberry Harbours.

More D-Day

Commandos of 47 (RM) Commando coming ashore on Jig Green beach, Gold area, 6 June 1944.
© IWM (B 5246)
Second World War
7 Clever Innovations Used on D-Day
From British mathematician Arthur Thomas Doodson's Tide-prediction machine, and PLUTO (short for 'pipeline under the ocean' - supplied petrol from Britain to Europe), to the German's 'Rommel's Asparagus', discover 7 clever innovations used on D-Day.
Sherman DD (Duplex Drive) amphibious tank with waterproof float screens. When in the water the float screen was raised and the rear propellers came into operation.
D-Day
The 'Funny' Tanks of D-Day
These unusual vehicles played an important role in the D-Day landings, the Battle of Normandy and the campaign in north-west Europe. In early 1943, the 79th Armoured Division under the command of Major-General Sir Percy Hobart was given responsibility for developing equipment and tactics to perform specialised tasks in support of ground troops on and after D-Day.
Nearly 25,000 men of the British 50th Division landed on Gold beach on D-Day
IWM B 5140
D-Day
What you Need to Know about the D-Day Beaches
On 6 June 1944 – ‘D-Day’ – Allied forces launched the largest amphibious invasion in the history of warfare. Codenamed Operation ‘Overlord’, the Allied landings on the beaches of Normandy marked the start of a long and costly campaign to liberate north-west Europe from Nazi occupation.