Women at War

How far did the war really impact women's lives and women's rights?

During the First World War, women stepped into men’s jobs for the first time ever, thousands of women served abroad on the front lines, women’s football even became a hugely popular sport, and the war is thought to have strengthened their case for the right to vote. But how far did the war really impact women's lives and women's rights, or was it all 'for the duration'?

Delving into the IWM film and sound archives, we uncover some incredible true stories of the women who served and worked during the First World War.

Order and license the HD clips used in this video on IWM Film’s website: https://film.iwmcollections.org.uk/c/1148

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