John Delaney, Head of Second World War and Mid 20th Century
Friday 31 May 2019

What was D-Day?

What was D-Day?

On 6 June 1944, Allied forces launched Operation Overlord and began the fight to liberate north-west Europe from German occupation. 

Hear IWM curator John Delaney explain how this complex land, sea and air operation was planned - and the significance of the Allied success. 

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D-Day 75
© IWM
D-Day
D-Day75

This June marks the 75th anniversary of D-Day, the largest combined naval, air and land operation in the history of warfare.

This Summer we will retell the extraordinary land, air and sea story through our Second World War collection and three historic sites, HMS Belfast, IWM Duxford and Churchill War Rooms, which experienced first-hand the events of D-Day.

The Supreme Command of the Allied Expeditionary Force, 1944
© IWM (TR 1629)
Second World War
Why D-Day Was So Important to Allied Victory
The invasion of northern France in 1944 was the most significant victory of the Western Allies in the Second World War. The German Army suffered a catastrophe greater than that of Stalingrad, the defeat in North Africa or even the massive Soviet summer offensive of 1944.
Troops storm ashore from LCAs (Landing Craft Assault) during Exercise 'Fabius', a major invasion rehearsal on the British coast, 5 May 1944. Nearest landing craft is LCA 798.
© IWM (H 38244)
D-Day
These Incredible Photos Show The Allies Preparing for D-Day
See IWM's collection of photography detailing soldiers training for D-Day
Commandos of 47 (RM) Commando coming ashore on Jig Green beach, Gold area, 6 June 1944.
© IWM (B 5246)
D-Day
D-Day Explored
Watch our special D-Day75 video series featuring IWM curators exploring the story of D-Day.