Wednesday 20 June 2018

Peter Kennard was born in London in 1949 and began studying at The Slade School of Fine Art in 1967. While there, he became involved with anti-Vietnam War protests and decided to move away from painting to find a medium more suited to his activism. He began working with different photographs, cutting them and joining them together to create new pictures, with new messages. In the 1970s his work had only a small audience but this grew in the 1980s during the protests surrounding cruise missiles and the revival of Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament (CND).

At the time CND were still using images from the Ministry of Defense in their campaigns, which Kennard believed lessened the effectiveness of their message. He felt that CND were unaware of the power of using art in their campaigns and began creating images for them. He also wanted to challenge some of the images, produced during the Cold War, that had become acceptable in popular culture. He felt photomontages were a particularly effective way of tackling Cold War issues because the messages contained within them were harder to manipulate. Although Kennard created a great deal of work for CND, he was never officially a member.

Kennard has been heavily influenced by the Cold War, especially relating to anti-war protests and nuclear disarmament. He has never been paid for any of the artwork he created for protest groups. Instead, he wants to encourage people to think about what is happening around them, believing that artists with strong political views should express them in their work.

Here are six of Kennard's powerful protest posters.

posters

Use Your Loaf

posters

Use Your Loaf

‘Use Your Loaf’, Peter Kennard.

‘Use Your Loaf’, Peter Kennard © The artist.
‘Use Your Loaf’, Peter Kennard © The artist.
posters

NEVER AGAIN

posters

NEVER AGAIN

‘Never Again’, Peter Kennard.

‘Never Again’, Peter Kennard ©The artist.
‘Never Again’, Peter Kennard ©The artist.
art

Target London 1

art

Target London 1

‘Title Page, Target London 1’, A Set of Photomontage Posters on Civil Defence in London, 1985, Peter Kennard.

The cover of the box shows the same image as this poster. The background is lined with a close-up map of the London area and surrounding towns. The area of the city itself has been burnt out leaving a large circular hole of black space. In this space there is a skeleton holding a 'Protect and Survive' booklet.
‘Title Page, Target London 1’, Peter Kennard, 1985. ©The artist.
art

Cruising On London, Target London 5

art

Cruising On London, Target London 5

‘Cruising on London, Target London 5’, A Set of Photomontage Posters on Civil Defence in London, Peter Kennard.

‘Cruising on London, Target London 5’, A Set of Photomontage Posters on Civil Defence in London, Peter Kennard ©.
‘Cruising on London, Target London 5’, A Set of Photomontage Posters on Civil Defence in London, Peter Kennard ©.
art

World War III, Target London 7

art

World War III, Target London 7

‘World War III, Target London 7', A Set of Photomontage Posters on Civil Defence in London, Peter Kenard.

‘World War III, Target London 7', A Set of Photomontage Posters on Civil Defence in London, Peter Kenard ©The artist.
‘World War III, Target London 7', A Set of Photomontage Posters on Civil Defence in London, Peter Kenard ©The artist.
art

‘For Londoners Safety, Target London 16’

art

‘For Londoners Safety, Target London 16’

‘For Londoners Safety, Target London 16’, A Set of Photomontage Posters on Civil Defence in London, Peter Kennard.

‘For Londoners Safety, Target London 16’, A Set of Photomontage Posters on Civil Defence in London, Peter Kennard ©The artist.
‘For Londoners Safety, Target London 16’, A Set of Photomontage Posters on Civil Defence in London, Peter Kennard ©The artist.

Related Content

CND logo in red with FUCK W*R printed in blue on the lower bars. Text below reads: *U.S. Gov't. regulations prohibit the printing of obscene words.
Gimbo, Fuck W*r *US Gov't regulations prohibits the printing of obscene words (1970) © Gimbo.
People Power: Fighting For Peace
Six Protest Posters From the 1960s and 1970s
After the Second World War, the United States and the Soviet Union continued to develop and test nuclear weapons. Britain became the third nuclear power in the late 1950s. Many people in Britain were frightened and horrified by these actions. There was a rise in protests against nuclear weapons. Here are six protest posters from the 1960s and 1970s.
Britons. Join Your Country's Army!
© IWM (Art.IWM PST 2734)
History
First World War Recruitment Posters

KS3-4

First World War