Tuesday 26 June 2018

The Gallipoli Campaign holds a special significance for Australia and New Zealand. An annual commemoration on 25 April - marking the anniversary of Allied troops first landing on the Gallipoli peninsula in 1915 - began in 1916 and is now the most important day for remembering military casualties in both countries.

At the start of the First World War, Australia and New Zealand were both comparatively young nations. Their participation in that global conflict brought them onto the world stage and gave each country a strong national identity that remains to this day.

Soldiers from the Australian Imperial Force (AIF) and New Zealand Expeditionary Force (NZEF) were formed into the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) in Egypt in early 1915. This combined force, including around 20,000 Australians and 8,500 New Zealanders, then joined British and French troops in the landings on the Gallipoli peninsula in April that year.

The Allied forces at Gallipoli suffered months of stalemate, and many thousands of casualties, as the early aims of the campaign were abandoned. All attempts to break through the Turkish lines failed, and the campaign drew to a close in late 1915. The final troops were evacuated from Gallipoli in January 1916.

These photographs show just some of the thousands of Australians and New Zealanders who served in the Gallipoli Campaign.

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1. Wounded comrade

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1. Wounded comrade

An Australian carrying his wounded mate to a medical aid post for treatment, Gallipoli, 1915. 

An Australian carrying a wounded comrade on his shoulders on Walkers Ridge down to a medical aid post. The men were cracking jokes as they made their way down from the front.
An Australian carrying his wounded mate to a medical aid post for treatment, Gallipoli, 1915.
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2. Game of cricket

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2. Game of cricket

Allied troops in the only game of cricket played on the peninsula during the campaign. It was an attempt to distract the Turks from the imminent departure of Allied troops.

Leisure and entertainment at the Front: A game of cricket being played at Shell Green - the only game of cricket played on the Gallipoli peninsula. Major George Macarthur Onslow of the Light Horse, batting, is being caught out. Shells were passing overhead all the time the game was in progress. This game was an attempt to distract the Turks from the imminent departure of Allied troops. With the exception of letter writing and sea bathing, the troops at Gallipoli had virtually no opportunity for recreation.
Allied troops in the only game of cricket played on the peninsula during the campaign.
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3. Anzac Cove

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3. Anzac Cove

Australians landing at Anzac Cove, 25 April 1915.

Australians landing at Anzac Cove at 8am, 25 April 1915 - part of the 4th Battalion and the mules for the 26th (Jacob's) Indian Mountain Battery. In the foreground is the staff of Colonel H N MacLaurin of the 1st Infantry Brigade. The officer with the rolled greatcoat over his shoulder is Major F D Irvine (killed on 27 April). Nearer the water's edge (centre) is Captain D M King, Orderly Officer. The officer on the left, with his chinstrap down, is Lieutenant R G Hamilton, the Brigade Signal Officer.
© IWM (Q 112876)
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4. First aid

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4. First aid

Australians carrying wounded back from the firing line.

Australians carrying wounded back from the firing line.
Australians carrying wounded back from the firing line.
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5. Quinn's Post

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5. Quinn's Post

Support troops from the 4th Australian Infantry Brigade wait behind Quinn's Post, Gallipoli, after it was retaken on 29 May 1915.

Support troops from the 4th Australian Infantry Brigade wait behind Quinn's Post, Gallipoli, after it was retaken on 29 May 1915.
Support troops from the 4th Australian Infantry Brigade wait behind Quinn's Post, Gallipoli, after it was retaken on 29 May 1915.
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6. Smiling Maori

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6. Smiling Maori

A Maori soldier in the Apex trenches on 30 November 1915.

A Maori in the Apex trenches on 30 November 1915. The cheerfulness of the Maoris in the New Zealand contingent, despite terrible conditions, was noted by many observers.
A Maori soldier in the Apex trenches on 30 November 1915.
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7. Despatch rider

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7. Despatch rider

An Australian despatch rider galloping along the coast road at Anzac Cove to avoid sniping. He is passing a war cemetery.

An Australian despatch rider galloping along the coast road at Anzac Cove to avoid sniping. He is passing a war cemetery. Out to sea is a hospital hip and a cruiser.
An Australian despatch rider galloping along the coast road at Anzac Cove to avoid sniping. He is passing a war cemetery.
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8. Back from leave

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8. Back from leave

New Zealanders return to Gallipoli by picket boat after a rest in Lemnos.

Leave: New Zealanders return to Gallipoli by picket boat after a rest in Lemnos. Returning from leave was always the occasion for depression.
New Zealanders return to Gallipoli by picket boat after a rest in Lemnos.
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9. Evening football

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9. Evening football

Men of the Australian Army Medical Corps playing football in the evening.

Men of the Australian Army Medical Corps playing football in the evening. A shell of the "evening hate" (shelling by the enemy in the evening) is seen bursting in the background. The highest ground to the right on the horizon (not shown in this print) is Achi Baba.
Men of the Australian Army Medical Corps playing football in the evening.
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10. Taking a break

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10. Taking a break

New Zealand soldiers resting in the trenches on Rhodedendron Spur, Gallipoli, a few weeks after it was taken.

New Zealand soldiers resting in the trenches on Rhodedendron Spur, Gallipoli, a few weeks after it was taken.
New Zealand soldiers resting in the trenches on Rhodedendron Spur, Gallipoli, a few weeks after it was taken.
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11. Water for a wounded soldier

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11. Water for a wounded soldier

An Australian infantryman gives a drink to a wounded Turkish soldier during the Gallipoli Campiagn, 1915.

An Australian infantryman gives a drink to a wounded Turkish soldier during the Gallipoli Campaign in 1915. Achi Baba can be seen in the background.
An Australian infantryman gives a drink to a wounded Turkish soldier during the Gallipoli Campiagn, 1915.
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12. Bomb throwing

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12. Bomb throwing

Australian troops practising bomb throwing.

Australian troops practising bomb throwing. Hand grenades were a weapon strange to the Australians until they were subsequently manufactured on the Beach from jam tins and scraps of metal.
Australian troops practising bomb throwing.
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13. Head wound

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13. Head wound

Australian soldiers dressing the head wound of an injured comrade with his first aid field dressing.

Australian soldiers dressing the head wound of an injured comrade with his first aid field dressing.
Australian soldiers dressing the head wound of an injured comrade with his first aid field dressing.
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14. Dug-outs at Gaba Tepe

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14. Dug-outs at Gaba Tepe

Australian and New Zealand troops at their dug-outs at Gaba Tepe.

 Australian and New Zeland troops at their dug-outs at Gaba Tepe.
© IWM (Q 13823)
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15. Road-making party

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15. Road-making party

An ANZAC road-making party, and a number of men of several units with a fatigue party of Turkish men, and French soldiers further back. In the background is the Old Castle at Sedd el Bahr.

An ANZAC road-making party, and a number of men of several units with a fatigue party of Turkish men, and French soldiers further back. In the background is the Old Castle at Sedd el Bahr.
An ANZAC road-making party, and a number of men of several units with a fatigue party.

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