© IWM MAR 40

Object Details

Category
Vehicles, aircraft and ships
Related period
First World War (production), Second World War (association)
Production date
1915
Materials

Bell: brass

Dimensions

whole: Depth 265 mm, Height 436 mm, Weight 20 kg, Width 265 mm

Catalogue number
MAR 40

Object associations

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cross patté (described in the Royal Warrant as a 'Maltese cross of bronze') having at its centre a crown surmounted by 'lion gardant'; beneath the crown an ornamentally draped scroll bearing the motto: 'FOR VALOUR'. Raised borders outline the shape of the cross. The plain reverse bears a central circle (with raised edge) to enclose the date of the act of gallantry. The suspension bar comprises a straight laurelled bar with integral 'V' lug
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