© IWM (UNI 13067)
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Object details

Category
Uniforms and insignia
Related period
Second World War (association)
Materials

Waist Tape Closure: metal

Buttons: plastic

Jacket: cotton

Dimensions

PR Sleeve Opening: Circumference 255 mm

PL Sleeve Opening: Circumference 260 mm

Chest: Circumference 950 mm

Waist: Circumference 985 mm

Collar: Height 40 mm

PL Shoulder: Length 163 mm

PR Shoulder: Length 165 mm

PR Side Seam: Length 475 mm

PL Side Seam: Length 485 mm

PR Sleeve: Length 605 mm

PL Sleeve: Length 610 mm

Centre Front: Length 670 mm

Centre Back: Length 730 mm

Neck: 405

Catalogue number
UNI 13067

Object associations

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