Object Details

Category
Weapons and ammunition
Related period
Pre-1914 (production), Second World War (association)
Creator
Deutsche Waffen-und Munitionsfabriken, Berlin
Production date
1908
Dimensions

whole: Length 24 cm

Catalogue number
FIR 10672

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