© IWM (Art.IWM ART 1610)
previous
next
  • Use this image under non-commercial licence.

    The media for this item are free to reuse for non-commercial purposes under the IWM Non Commercial Licence. Video, sound and images can be embedded with the code we offer here, and images can also be downloaded. By downloading any images or embedding any media, you agree to the terms and conditions of the IWM Non Commercial Licence, including your use of the attribution statement specified by IWM. For this item, that is: © IWM (Art.IWM ART 1610)

    Embed
    HTML: BBCode:
  • Use this image under non-commercial licence.

    The media for this item are free to reuse for non-commercial purposes under the IWM Non Commercial Licence. Video, sound and images can be embedded with the code we offer here, and images can also be downloaded. By downloading any images or embedding any media, you agree to the terms and conditions of the IWM Non Commercial Licence, including your use of the attribution statement specified by IWM. For this item, that is: © IWM (Art.IWM ART 1610)

    Embed
    HTML: BBCode:

Object details

Category
art
Related period
First World War (production), First World War (content)
Creator
Sargent, John Singer
Production date
1918
Materials

Frame: wood

Support: paper

Glazing: perspex

Mount: board

medium: Watercolour

Dimensions

Frame: Depth 41 mm, Height 651 mm, Width 856 mm

Support: Height 342 mm, Width 533 mm

Catalogue number
Art.IWM ART 1610

Related content

British and German soldiers fraternising at Ploegsteert, Belgium, on Christmas Day 1914, Front of 11th Brigade, 4th Division.
IWM Q 70074
First World War
The Real Story of the Christmas Truce
The Christmas Truce has become one of the most famous and mythologised events of the First World War. But what was the real story behind the truce? Why did it happen and did British and German soldiers really play football in no-man's land?
French troops manning a captured German Maxim gun at Fort Douaumont, Verdun, 1916.
© IWM (Q 69971)
A letter from Emily Chitticks to her fiancé.
IWM (Documents.2554)
First World War
Letters To Loved Ones
During the First World War, letter writing was the main form of communication between soldiers and their loved ones, helping to ease the pain of separation. The British Army Postal Service delivered around 2 billion letters during the war. In 1917 alone, over 19,000 mailbags crossed the English Channel each day, transporting letters and parcels to British troops on the Western Front.