© IWM Art.IWM PST 17588
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Object details

Category
Posters
Related period
First World War (production), First World War (content)
Creator
Pennell, Joseph (Undefined)
Alco-Gravure Inc, New York (printer)
Production date
1918
Place made
United States of America
Materials

Support: paper

medium: lithograph

Dimensions

Support: Height 840 mm, Width 560 mm

Mount: Height 550 mm, Width 810 mm

Catalogue number
Art.IWM PST 17588

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