Men of 12 Platoon, 'B' Company, 6th Royal Scots Fusiliers, 15th (Scottish) Division, wait for the order to advance during Operation 'Epsom', 26 June 1944.
© IWM (B 5950)
Second World War
Tactics And The Cost Of Victory In Normandy
The Normandy campaign saw the Anglo-American armies inflict a decisive defeat on the German military machine. The British Army's role was pivotal, but victory came at a price. Between D-Day and the end of August some 83,000 British, Canadian and Polish troops became casualties, of whom almost 16,000 were killed. These losses were a reflection of the nature of the campaign, fought against a tenacious and committed enemy obliged by Hitler to contest every foot of ground.
Infantry tank Mk I Matilda I (A11)
© IWM (KID 1081)
Second World War
Britain's Struggle To Build Effective Tanks During The Second World War
For much of the Second World War, the British Army was saddled with a succession of tanks that ranged from the bad to the barely adequate. Some were rushed into service too quickly and proved notoriously unreliable. Others spent too long in development, or only achieved a degree of usefulness after numerous modifications. Most lacked the armour to resist enemy anti-tank weapons, and nearly all were under-gunned.
Paratroopers and 'parapack' supply containers drop between Heelsum and Wolfheze, west of Arnhem, on 17 September 1944.
© IWM (BU 1162)
British troops moving up to the line during fighting in the Odon valley in Normandy, July 1944
© IWM (B 7427)
Second World War
What Happened After D-Day?
On 6 June 1944, D-Day, Allied troops landed on the coast of Normandy. It was the start of the campaign to liberate Europe and defeat Germany. The Battle of Normandy was a hard-fought campaign. British divisions bore the brunt of German resistance on the eastern flank of the front, enabling US forces to stage a breakout in the west.
Supermarine Spitfire Mk I of No. 19 Squadron at Fowlmere in Cambridgeshire, 21 September 1940.
© IWM (CH 1447)
The Supreme Command of the Allied Expeditionary Force, 1944
© IWM (TR 1629)
Second World War
Why D-Day Was So Important To Allied Victory
The invasion of northern France in 1944 was the most significant victory of the Western Allies in the Second World War
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