The Artists Of Asia Triennial Manchester 2014

Discover the renowned artists exploring the theme Conflict and Compassion, as part of the Asia Triennial Manchester 2014 (ATM14).

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  • Aman Mojadidi - Commodified

    Mojadidi’s artwork explores the complexities within the transformation of conflict into a commodity through "war souvenirs."

    Mojadidi’s artwork explores the complexities within the transformation of conflict into a commodity through "war souvenirs." He aims to make work that disturbs identity and challenges authority. Mojadidi is an American artist of Afghan descent known for his public, site-specific art projects.

  • Alinah Azadeh - Child’s Play / Book of Debts

    A sculptural installation rooted in the idea of revolution and Book of Debts, with a focus on debt, conflict and resolution.

    A sculptural installation rooted in the idea of revolution, influenced by Azadeh’s own experiences and those of communities displaced by conflict. She also brings Book of Debts, with a focus on debt, conflict and resolution. Azadeh is a British artist of Iranian heritage.

  • Sophie Ernst - The Vanquished

    Using the archives at IWM North, Ernst has produced a new sculptural piece that asks, what is a conflict?

    Using the archives at IWM North, Ernst has produced a new sculptural piece that asks, what is a conflict? She follows the idea of projection in relation to space, architecture, culture, history, and identity. Ernst is a Dutch video artist based in the UK, concerned with political turmoil.

  • Nalini Malani - In Search of Vanished Blood

    Malani shows a single video presentation in IWM North’s Silo 3 inspired by literature on status of women in Indian society.

    Inspired by literature concerned with the status of women in Indian society, Malani shows a single video presentation in IWM North’s Silo 3, transforming the space into an emotive experience for the viewer.

  • Imran Qureshi - Selected works

    These works highlight Pakistan's recent history and its tragic centrality in current events.

    These works highlight Pakistan's recent history and its tragic centrality in current events. Qureshi has achieved global recognition as a leading figure of international contemporary art. He combines the centuries-old Islamic miniature painting with conceptual approaches. 

  • Bashir Makhoul with Ray Yang - Enter Ghost Exist Ghost, The Genie

    Makhoul’s new installation is a village constructed out of cardboard boxes.

    Makhoul’s new installation is a village constructed out of cardboard boxes, representing the temporary nature of settlements, dwelling, and encampments. Makhoul is a Palestinian artist based in the UK.

  • Shezad Dawood - Babalon Rising

    Dawood takes imagery related to ancient magical systems and feminine cults, and combines with vintage pottery.

    Dawood takes imagery related to ancient magical systems and feminine cults, and combines vintage killim, neon and ancient Mesopotamian pottery in this site-specific response to the museum. Informed by his British and Pakistani heritage, Dawood works across film, painting and sculpture.

  • Dark Border Developments (DbD) present Pop-Up Republics

    Located in four shipping containers in IWM North’s car park, this project is a portable micro-nation.

    Located in four shipping containers in IWM North’s car park, Pop-up Republics involves four artist-curator collectives who have created a portable micro-nation that can exist in the most globally consistent unit of space – the shipping container.

    The exhibition, through its exploration of borders, raises issues of identity struggles, the limitations of belonging and the physical and metaphorical impositions of boundary in a contemporary globalised world.

    The micro-nation artists, which have been newly commissioned for the project, are Anti-cool, Chen Chieh-Jen, Cotard Syndicate and Daksha Patel.

  • Shamsia Hassani - Selected works

    Afghan's first female graffiti artist's distinctive work is enlarged and displayed outisde IWM North

    Afghanistan’s first female graffiti artist’s distinctive work is enlarged and displayed in 16” frames outside IWM North. To avoid danger and harassment in the streets of Kabul, Hassani works in abandoned buildings, or uses Photoshop to apply graffiti to selected sites in Kabul in a method she calls ‘Dream of Graffiti’.