Boots, ankle length ('ammunition boots'), O/Rs

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Catalogue number
  • UNI 13168
Materials
  • boots: leather
  • studs: metal
Alternative Names
  • FULL NAME: Boots, ankle length ('ammunition boots'), O/Rs
  • SIMPLE NAME: Footwear: British
Category
uniforms and insignia

Label

The British Army reverted to black leather ankle boots for non-commissioned personnel after the First World War. Constructed of leather with the smooth side outermost, from the 1930s they were fitted with protective toe caps of similar style to those used by earlier munitions workers - a plausible explanation why this style of boot became known henceforward as "ammunition boots". The soles however were studded, initially of 25 studs per boot but this was reduced from April 1942 to 15. As a further measure of economy, by August of the same year this was reduced to 13. Vehicle drivers were prohibited from wearing studded footwear, and crews of armoured vehicles were added in 1942, with those operating waterborne transports of the Royal Army Service Corps included in 1943.

History note

The British Army reverted to black leather ankle boots for non-commissioned personnel after the First World War. Constructed of leather with the smooth side outermost, from the 1930s they were fitted with protective toe caps of similar style to those used by earlier munitions workers - a plausible explanation why this style of boot became known henceforward as "ammunition boots". The soles however were studded, initially of 25 studs per boot but this was reduced from April 1942 to 15. As a further measure of economy, by August of the same year this was reduced to 13. Vehicle drivers were prohibited from wearing studded footwear, and crews of armoured vehicles were added in 1942, with those operating waterborne transports of the Royal Army Service Corps included in 1943.

Physical description

Boots Pair of black leather laced ankle length boots with toe caps and studded soles.

Associated people and organisations

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