Grenade, hand, anti-tank, No 73 Mk 1 ('Thermos Flask')

Catalogue number
  • MUN 1587
Department
Exhibits
Production date
1941
Materials
  • Cylinder: steel
  • Lid: tin
  • whole: metal
  • whole: bakelite
  • whole: cloth
Dimensions
  • whole: Diameter 83 mm, Length 242 mm
Alternative names
  • full name: Grenade, hand, anti-tank, No 73 Mk 1 ('Thermos Flask')
  • simple name: grenade : British
Creator
Category
Weapons and ammunition

© IWM (MUN 1587)

Purchase & License
Label

This British Second World War period No 73 Grenade Mk 1, sometimes referred to as the 'Thermos Flask' model, for obvious reasons, was first introduced into service in November 1940, but declared obsolete in October 1941. It was reintroduced in March 1943 and again declared obsolete in January 1946. Although originally made as an anti-tank grenade, it was made obsolete when better anti-tank grenades became available, and whilst not particularly useful in the anti-tank role, it made a good demolition charge due to its large explosive content. Its re-introduction was probably as a small demolition charge for use by the infantry against pillboxes and dug in positions.

Physical description

cylinder, cap, detonator housing, striker/fuse housing, activating tape, safety cap the body of the No 73 Grenade consisted of a large sheet steel cylinder, with the bottom permanently attached by rolling and soldering. The top was closed by a tin lid, which screwed onto the cylinder, and had a threaded recess in the middle to accept an 'All Ways' Fuze. The body was normally painted buff, and had the manufacturer's mark, lot number, and date of filling as well as the type of filling, stencilled on to it. This particular example was made by the Metal Box Co. Ltd. in 1941, and the filling initials 'P.A.G.D.' indicate that the filling was polar ammon gelatin dynamite. When filled, it would have weighed about 64oz, and is 9.5cm long and 3.25in diameter.

History note

This British Grenade, sometimes referred to as the "Thermos Flask" model, for obvious reasons, was first introduced into service in November 1940, but declared obsolete in October 1941. It was reintroduced in March 1943 and again declared obsolete in January 1946. Although originally made as an anti-tank grenade, it was made obsolete when better anti-tank grenades became available, and whilst not particularly useful in the anti-tank role, it made a good demolition charge due to its large explosive content. The reintroduction was probably as a small demolition charge for the infantry against pillboxes and dug in positions.

Printed (on outside)

P.A.G.D. 73.A.T. Mk.1. M.B.Co.41. 03^

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