Verdun

Fair Use

All Rights Reserved except for Fair Dealing exceptions otherwise permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

Catalogue number
  • Art.IWM PST 12801
Production date
1919
Place made
France
Subject period
Materials
  • medium: lithograph
  • support: paper
Dimensions
  • Support: Height 1061 mm
  • Support: Width 752 mm
  • Mount: Height 513 mm
  • Mount: Width 767 mm
Alternative Names
  • object category: Poster
Creator
Category
posters

Object description

whole: the image occupies the majority and is held within a black border. The title is integrated and positioned in the lower right, in orange outlined black. The text is separate and positioned along the bottom edge, in black. The text is set against a white background. image: two French soldiers, laden with large backpacks, march along the bank of the Meuse River. The river runs through the heavily bombed city of Verdun in which some of the buildings are on fire. More soldiers in the background stand on a bridge over the river. Verdun Cathedral stands further in the background. whole: Verdun MAURIC TOUSSAINT 1919 ÉDITÉ PAR LA COMPAGNIE DES CHEMINS DE FER DE L'EST CORNILLE et SERRE - IMPRIMEURS, 19, Rue du Terrage, PARIS. [Verdun. Published by the Eastern Railway Company. Cornille and Serre Printers [address].]

Label

The Battle of Verdun was the most extended battle of the First World War. From February to December 1916, the French defended the fortified town of Verdun against repeated German attacks. Although it was not strategically important, the French regarded Verdun as vital to morale and national pride: it had been a French military base since Roman times, and was the last fortress to fall to the Prussians in the Franco-Prussian War. During the course of the battle 259 of the French army's 330 infantry regiments had been involved. French counter-attacks eventually pushed the Germans back to where they had started, and the Kaiser's new Chief of Staff, Paul von Hindenburg, called off the attack. There were very heavy casualties on both sides, and it is estimated that between 250,000 and 500,000 men died at Verdun.

Physical description

Part of a series of posters depicting war damage in a variety of French towns (see PST 12802, PST 12803, PST 12804, PST 12805 and PST 12806).

Inscription

32868

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